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Posts Tagged ‘Orphans’

Behind the Scenes: Doc and Mirna

Thursday, October 12th, 2017

Doctor Castro with children from Dorie's Promise Guatemala.

By Kelly Shank –

IMany children who live in our home have endured malnourishment, abandonment, and abuse.f you’re a parent you understand how scary it can be when your child is sick, that helpless feeling when you don’t know what is wrong or what to do. Now imagine multiplying those feelings by 40 children. Describing how important Dr. Castro “Doc” and Mirna, our nurse, are is almost impossible. They play a critical role in the care we give our children and help us maintain the overall health of our home so we can continue to accept new children.

If you have the chance to chat with Doc you will soon understand that his focus is on the total health of our kids, not just the physical. In his mind, the physical health of our children helps unlock the emotional and spiritual health of our kids too.

Many children who live in our home have endured malnourishment, abandonment, and abuse. He believes that physical health and the relief of physical ailments support the other therapies our children receive and help them recover. He helps them become physically strong so they can then focus on their emotional health.

Several very special children have called Dorie’s Promise home because of the daily care given by Doc and Mirna. Those who have been with us for many years will remember Alex. Although confined to a wheelchair and non-verbal he had an infectious smile and loved to be around people. Doc and Mirna made sure that Alex experienced life to the fullest. Josue, Efraim, and Lester are all also thriving in their own unique ways today thanks to Doc.

Thanks to the love and care given by Doc and Mirna we continue to welcome children with difficult medical conditions that other homes are not able to accommodate.

Learn more about Doc and Mirna.

Doc:

Doctor Castro in his office at Dorie's Promise,Doc really has been a lifesaver at Dorie’s Promise. Early in his tenure with us he was able to combat an outbreak that sickened many children by working around the clock to care for our children. In the years since he has established an outstanding medical care program for our children. Having dedicated his career to Pediatrics, he now focuses on caring for the most vulnerable children who do not have access to medical care. In additional to his work at Dorie’s Promise, he also provides medical care in several rural villages and is our coffee guy. If you meet him, he’ll be sure to tell you about his coffee, it’s the second best in the world!

Mirna:

Mirna assists Doctor CastroConsistency and compassion are two traits that help children thrive in our home. With her genuine love of our children, Mirna has embodied these traits over the last twelve years. Being one of nine children, and mother to three daughters herself, family is very important to Mirna. Her love for our children shines through every day as we greets everyone with a smile. Working in our home is more than just a job for her. Children come into our home with many fears and problems but slowly they begin to heal. Mirna is humbled to be doing the work for which God has equipped her and to have part in caring for vulnerable children. Outside of work you will find Mirna using her nursing skills to care for those in her community or spending time with her family.

We are so thankful for Doc and Mirna’s commitment to our children. You can help support our medical services by making a one-time donation towards medical care today (leave Medical Care in the comment field) or joining us as a monthly sponsor.

Being Family for Orphans Remaining in Guatemala

Monday, October 2nd, 2017

Being Family for Orphans Remaining in Guatemala

By Kelly Shank –

Mission team members with staff and children at Dorie's Promise Guatemala.Interestingly, when you have the chance to sit on our couch holding the most beautiful baby or run through the grass and listen to kids laugh as you chase them, there’s something that happens deep inside your soul. You start to see our kids as your own. They aren’t just another orphan. You know their names, what they like to do, and maybe a little bit about their story.

Visiting our home changes people and one of the most frequent questions we get is if our kids can be adopted. The short answer is yes, but only by Guatemalan families.

Believe me, we understand the desire to scoop up our kids and bring them home where we can love on them every day. Each of us at Forever Changed International can tell our own stories about the children we have bonded with and our struggle with the reality that we cannot bring them home with us. This is my story.

Kelly and Alejandra:

Alejandra in 2015 before being adopted by a Guatemalan family.Probably because I had a 1 year old at home, I was drawn to the babies’ house during my first visit in 2011. Imagine 8 highchairs lined up along the living room wall and cribs filling the bedrooms. The dining room was a playroom at the time and someone always needed attention. In the midst of the toddlers was a little girl named Alejandra. She was the rambunctious one, always testing the limits and instigating trouble. Needless to say, we bonded quickly.

Even more so, Alejandra bonded with my husband. When he joined me the following year, the two became inseparable. The first hug my husband received would always be from Alejandra. When she spotted him, all things stopped, and she would run to give him a hug. The man who openly admits that he’s “not really into little kids” would scoop her up like one of his own. With her, our family felt complete. Even the Special Mothers noticed how much she loved my husband and their special bond.

By coincidence my husband and I were working at Dorie’s Promise on Alejandra’s fifth birthday. It was her birthday but the gift was ours as we sang and ate cake. Returning just a few months later I also witnessed Alejandra’s adoption story. On a sunny Sunday afternoon I met the lady who is now Alejandra’s adoptive mother and her biological brother who had been previously adopted. The following Friday morning I had the privilege of saying goodbye to the little girl I wanted to make my daughter as she left with her forever family.

God’s plan for Alejandra was not to take her away from Guatemala. Her story did not include having me as her mother. Instead, she was going to find her brother and a Guatemalan family who would love her. As I look back on the time we spent with Alejandra and the opportunities that God gave us to share in her life I understand that He was showing me how be a family to the orphaned children who will remain in Guatemala.

A special mother reads to children at Dorie's Promise.When Heather Radu started working in Guatemala our primary focus was facilitating adoptions with American families. More than 400 children found forever families through our efforts until international adoptions were halted in 2008.

The transition away from international adoptions gave us the opportunity to refocus how we serve the children in our home and the people of Guatemala. Although we pray each of our children will find a loving family, for many kids we become their family as they grow up in our home.

Just as you do for your children, we give each child opportunities that meet their unique gifts and needs. Some will attend trade schools or universities while others may be in our care long-term due to medical needs. Seeing them succeed is our goal.

In May 2016 the Guatemalan government announced that their priority is to develop a successful domestic adoption program within their country before they will consider reestablishing an international adoption program. Although some people may be disappointed by this decision, we see it as an opportunity for us to do important work.

We want to raise a generation of leaders who will bring about justice and change in Guatemala. We truly believe that the children currently living in our home have the ability to become successful teachers, lawyers, doctors, business owners, and so much more in Guatemala. By instilling faith, integrity, and intellect into our children as they mature we envision leaders coming of age who are able to impact change for all the people of Guatemala, especially children and families with backgrounds similar to their own.

Our children have the opportunity to break the cycle of poverty one child at a time through education, opportunity, and love!

Orphan Care through Missions

Monday, August 7th, 2017

A child get her lunch from Pastor Mercedez lunch program.

By Kelly Shank –

God has called us to passionately serve the world’s forgotten children through life-changing ministries.

Yire was brought to Dorie's Promise at only 2 months old. Heather Radu came to Guatemala seventeen years ago to serve children who were vulnerable and forgotten, helping hundreds of orphans be placed in loving families through Dorie’s Promise. In the years since international adoptions closed, we have become even more determined to remain in Guatemala and make a difference. We stayed because our commitment is to the children entrusted to our care and the country they will one day lead. God called us into missions as a way to support orphan care and we feel privileged to serve.

Children find their way into our home through a myriad of traumatic experiences and many will be with us for years.

Yire was brought to us at only 2 months old. Shortly thereafter his mother died, leaving him in our care indefinitely. Seven years later, Yire is thriving at Dorie’s Promise. The snuggly toddler with dark curly hair has grown into a bright little boy who enjoys playing with friends and going to school, just like your kids.

You might wonder how the missions program helps kids like Yire.Yire is now a bright eyed energetic seven year old.

Without trip participants we wouldn’t be able to sustain our home and offer the kind of care that changes lives. Trip participants help support our home financially, they provide much needed donations for our children, and they offer experiences we might not be able to afford otherwise. Even more importantly, those who meet our children often become long-term sponsors and are directly connected to the financial health of our home.

But what about all of the children who don’t live at Dorie’s Promise?

Missions helps us care for those children and their families as well. Throughout Guatemala other private organizations and government facilities care for children who make their way into the court system but the majority of the vulnerable children in Guatemala never make it onto any official records. Instead they represent those who are born into the cycle of poverty and whose families struggle to survive daily. Hunger, sickness, and lack of education are constant in their lives and they have few opportunities to change their life.

Imagine being born outside the Guatemala City landfill. From an early age you care for yourself because your parents work sorting recyclables day in and day out. If you’re lucky, your wood and tin home has a concrete floor and running water but that’s not guaranteed. On weekdays, you line up with other neighborhood kids to get a hot lunch from Pastor Mercedez at the feeding center. Hopefully you are in school instead of working. You don’t realize that life can be different.

The crowd getting a hot lunch from Pastor Mercedez at the feeding center.This is where missions helps our commitment to all of Guatemala, both in our home and in our communities. Our dedicated staff and teams allow us support local leaders and organizations that are working directly in these communities. We’re helping Pastor Mercedez feed more than 400 children each day so that their parents can work without worrying if they’re hungry. We bring much needed supplies to groups who tutor local children so that they have a better chance of finishing school.

Our goal is to improve the lives of the families so that they are able to keep their children in their homes. What we have learned is that these families love their children and most work hard to provide the best they can but the cycle of poverty is hard to overcome.

Slowly and deliberately we are learning how best to work with local leaders to provide opportunities for community change. We’re focusing on holistic healthcare, quality nutrition, and educational programs that aim to lift entire communities and begin changing the standard in Guatemala.

Child Sponsorship Needed

Monday, April 10th, 2017

The smiling faces of children whose lives have been Forever Changed at Dorie's Promise.

By Bradley Burck –

Orphans from fire in Guatemala

Marbely is a survivor of the fire at Virgen de Asuncion. She is now at Dorie’s Promise.

The current situation at Dorie’s Promise underscores the importance of Forever Changed International’s child sponsorship program.

As you may have read on our blog, the home recently accepted four children from the Virgen de Asuncion orphanage in Guatemala after a disastrous fire there in early March. The death toll at the state-run home recently reached 41, with several dozen others sustaining injuries.

In addition, we recently accepted three other children from desperate circumstances, which increased the number living at the home to 44, which is several above capacity.

Given the needs in Guatemala, sponsoring residents through FCI is an excellent way for people wanting to help to respond.

News reports outline the seriousness of the situation. Although designed to accommodate 400 people, the week of the fire the New York Times reported that 750 were crammed into the aging structures at the state-run orphanage.

The newspaper also reported that, although they had been removed from their homes for their own safety, many were victims of sexual assault and other abuse by staff members. The situation prompted criminal cases and complaints with the country’s human rights commission.

Alejandra Diaz, the director of Dorie’s Promise, says that feelings of frustration are common around Guatemala. This situation could have been avoided if the government had provided the care that the children at the state orphanage needed, she says.

Children like Elvis are in need of sponsors.

Children like Elvis (Age 5) are in need of sponsors.

“We are accepting the challenge to take more children, which has filled us beyond our capacity,” Alejandra says. “But we cannot stay indifferent to the need of a safe place for so many children.

“I wish we could have more space and resources to take more children so we could offer them the opportunities that we have provided to the children who have been with us for a long time.”

This situation cries out for prayer, which Alejandra says is one of the most important things that supporters in the United States and elsewhere can offer right now.

  • Pray for emotional relief for our newcomers
  • Pray that they would have a smooth transition
  • Pray too for the nation of Guatemala—that that positive changes can be made for so many children who live in poverty and serious circumstances

“The other important thing we need is their commitment to support us,” Alejandra says. “Not just now during this emergency, but ongoing support so we can offer as many children as possible a future and the opportunities to forever change their life.”

To read more about children who need sponsors, visit this page. Monthly sponsors provide ongoing safety and security for children and are needed now more than ever. Or give today, a special one time gift, to help the children who survived the fire at Virgen de Asuncion.

Dorie’s Promise Students Participate in the School Science Fair!

Thursday, July 14th, 2016

Students from Dorie's Promise participate in a science fair.

By MJ Zelya –

Ana smiling during a school activity.One of the things the children at Dorie’s Promise love the most is the chance to experience a wide range of different activities. We are especially excited when our children participate in fun school activities. The hands-on-learning they get from these activities helps them develop a lifelong love for learning.

Recently, the school held a Science Fair. The children were so excited! They couldn’t stop talking about it. All of them planning and thinking about what kind of experiments to do and if it’a going to work for them. They were happy, anxious, and enthusiastic- all at the same time.

We are glad to see them so excited for school, it’s really satisfying to watch them grow, becoming more responsible with their homework and see the effort they make to do their best.

Here some of them share their experience with their science experiments:

Fabiola – I did my presentation on making rainbows. The experiment was to use a disc and a candle to reproduce a rainbow. My friends and I worked together to prepared for the project. We worked through every step of the experiment. I was a little nervous, but with the support of my friends it encouraged me. In the end everything went really well.

Ingrid and Lucia – It was very fun for us. It was the first time we have participated in this kind of activity. Our experiment was to make a hologram with a box and a disc. The first step was to form the pieces of the disc into a triangle. A video is projected and the triangle shaped disc reflects the image. It was an unforgettable experience! The best part was sharing it with our peers and their parents, our Special Mothers and the others at home and our teacher. This have motivated us both to discover and learn more.

Silvia with her science fair gorup.Silvia – (For Silvia the fair meant a lot, because she is afraid of public speaking. The Science Fair was challenging for her, but gave her a chance to overcome her fears.) I was very nervous because I had to say a paragraph about the process of our experiment. We filled a water balloon with water and then had to keep it from exploding as we moved it closer to the fire from a candle. It caused my nerves to go crazy when I’d hear the explosion of a balloon, but I practice it a lot before we gave our presentation. I really wanted everything to go great. Having this experience gives me confidence and security in front of the school.

It’s incredible how all our children are growing, and it’s fun to watch them experiencing new things. Without the opportunity to attend to school they would not be getting opportunities like these that help prepare them for the future. Their lives are forever changing through this ministry! It’s because of your support that these children are preparing for a brighter future. Each year we need to raise over $50,000 to help provide exceptional education for our students. We are thankful for the many donors and sponsors who make this possible. Would you like to give a special gift for education? Go now.

Meet Sheily: A Little Ray of Sunshine

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015

Sheily is a little ray of sunshine.

By MJ Zelya-

Sheily will turn two later this month.Sheily came to Dorie’s Promise when she was 2 months old because she was abandoned by her biological mother. The last we’ve heard is that her mother is alcoholic and homeless. Because her biological family abandoned her and she was declared adoptable and CNA is looking for a Guatemalan family* to adopt her.

When Sheily was born she was suffering from fetal alcohol syndrome. This has caused her some developmental troubles such has being slow to gain height. She also has sign of emerging attention deficit hyperactivity. Yet with the loving care given to her at our home her development is getting better, and she is gaining weight.

Despite of the circumstances; she is a little ray of sunshine!!!

At first, she ignored people in order to avoid contact. After all the affection she has received at Dorie’s, she has become just the opposite. She waves at everyone that passes in front of her. As soon as she hears a song, she starts to dance and jump around. She has become a little parrot, she repeats everything!

Sheily outside with her Special mother going for a little walk.She is turning two this month, and she might not seem that age, but she has the skills! Through the early stimulation program, the Special Mothers help her learn new skills in the mornings and afternoons. Now she walks around the Home by herself, supervised of course, and whenever she enters a room she greets everyone.

Like most two-year-old’s when she is sleepy or hungry, she gets a little bit grouchy. She loves to play with balls, stuffed animals or dolls with José Carlos and Dulce. They love it when the Special Mothers let them be together in the same crib. It’s their little play date!!!

She is a loving girl and loves to be hugged and kissed, and she needs your support. When you sponsor an orphan like Sheily you help us provide the love and care that she needs. Care that goes beyond just providing for daily survival, we provide the children at our home the kind of care any parent would want for their own children. Sponsor Sheily today!

*International Adoptions in Guatemala closed in 2008

 

The Orphan Train

Thursday, June 4th, 2015

The Orphan Train on display at the opening gala for the Artisan Express.

By Dr. Cari Burck –

The trains base is being painted with some help from my son and his friend.I always thought I would be the mother and have a lot of children in my home. I had no idea God put that desire in my heart so that we could help start and run an orphanage in Guatemala. A lot of our family’s time, energy, and resources go to helping run Dorie’s Promise Guatemala. I help make the decisions about private schools, remodeling bedrooms, hiring chefs who understand nutrition, and coordinating care with our physician.

In many ways, I feel like the mother of the forty children we care for. I don’t get to hug on them and love on them face-to-face like I want. Still, I know they are getting everything they need to grow, thrive, and have the chance to be exactly who God created them to be in this world. My dream is that some of these children will grow up and solve the orphan problem in Guatemala.

Along with help from my friend, Michelle De Monnin—who owns De The Orphan Train on display in Hungtinton, WVMonnin’s Art Studio in Milton, Washington, we created The Orphan Train for the project. Originating as a fund-raiser for the new Hoops Family Children’s Hospital at Cabell Huntington Hospital, the Artisans Express project has become much more. The City of Huntington, WV teamed up with the Hoops Family Children’s Hospital and the Cabell Huntington Hospital Auxiliary to launch a collaborative art initiative called All Aboard! Artisans Express 2015.

Artists from throughout the Tri-State region applied their creativity to 40 fiberglass train engines that are on display throughout the city until fall. Afterwards, the trains will be sold in an auction to benefit the children’s hospital. Michelle helped take my idea for this train and bring it to life. She did the poster and designed the decals for the train. She is the co-artist for this project and I want to make sure she gets credit for that. She is also an adoptive mother of the most beautiful little girl from India, named Chloe. To say there is not a little bit of Chloe in this project just wouldn’t be true.

A lot of people came along side us and helped. My father-in-law, Don Burck, and my friend, Frank Schuler, spent time trying to figure out what we could do with the base. One of my favorite ideas from them was covering it with rocks.

My friend, Mike Emerson, at Huntington Steel figured out how to make the springs on the top of the train come to life. He also consulted on different ideas for the base. Without him, I think I would still be trying to apply coats of fiberglass to it. Mike finally said, “Just wrap the original wood base in metal and paint it.” I also need to give credit to the guys at Paris Signs for their work. Tony Wheeler there is a friend, helping take Mike’s concept for the springs to the next level. Paris also did the decals of the children and made the metal base for us. The painting on the base is—for good or bad—all mine and based on Michelle’s concept.

The Orphan Train on Display and Up CloseWhen people see my train, I want them to feel love for children.

I want them to be reminded that there are children everywhere who need them—especially in our region. There are so many ways to help. Adoption is the ultimate way to help, but not everybody can do that. Foster care is another way to help change lives. There are local kids that need you! I know adoption and foster care overwhelm people. That’s okay. Not everybody can do that, but everybody can do a monthly sponsorship or give a gift to an organization that cares for orphans.

That’s my message with this train: look around you and jump on the opportunities to change life for children who don’t have parents.

The train will be auctioned off later this year. You can bid on The Orphan Train here.

Read more about the Artisans Express project here- Public Art Inspires.

A Passion for Orphans

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Dr. Cari Burck (left) with Dorie Van Stone.

Dr. Cari Burck (left) with Dorie Van Stone.

By Dr. Cari Burck –

Working on the orphan train for the Artisans Express

Working on a project to raise public awareness of orphans in my hometown of Huntington, WV.

Most people don’t know it, but there is an orphan crisis in the world today. Depending on whose statistics you read, there are as many as eighteen million children in the world who have lost both their parents and are growing up in orphanages.

International adoptions were a huge thing for the last twenty-five years. The problem is that most countries have been shutting down international adoptions because of the criminal elements that worked their way into the process. So, countries like Romania, Bulgaria, and Guatemala (all which continue to have orphan issues) no longer allow Americans to adopt their orphaned children. Those children go into poorly-run and scarcely funded orphanages. Most of which, if you could see them, would make you turn your head in disgust.

We are not immune to the orphan challenge in the United States, where more than 397,000 children do not have permanent families and grow up in the foster care system. Sometimes that’s a wonderful experience for children. Sometimes it isn’t. About 25 percent of these children are eligible for adoption.

How we got involved with orphans is all a blur to me now. However, one of my husband’s clients was involved in international adoptions in Guatemala. When the Guatemalan government shut that process down, most adoption agencies just left. One of his clients decided to take over an orphanage there and run it. The home had forty children who would have been shipped out to the kinds of dreary institutions you see on television, where there is one caretaker for fifty children. She called us and said, “I need you to do this with me.” We agreed.

Lester's first smile.

Lester’s first smile.

I remember my first trip down to Guatemala. Although I went to take pictures for the new website we built, I spent most of my time getting up close to little ones, looking in their eyes, and smiling. There was a little guy about eight months old named Lester. Lester didn’t smile. The Special Mothers (that’s what we call our care takers) told me that he never smiled, no matter what. So I made it my mission to get Lester to smile. I just loved on him, gave him attention, and acted silly. I remember the Special Mothers watching me. I know they thought I was a little crazy. Little by little Lester began to crack. Before I left, I snapped the first picture of him smiling.

Today I’m on the board of directors of the organization we helped start. It is called Forever Changed International.

Our goal for our children is to always have one Special Mother for four children. We want our children always surrounded by love, to know they are loved, and to know that God loves them. That’s starting to pay off too. Our children in Guatemala are growing up and thriving. They have self-esteem and confidence like you wouldn’t imagine. I see the smiling pictures every month of Lester at school and playing with the other children. His Special Mom tells me that he has come so far since he was a little guy.

Coming in the next blog the Artisans Express public art project in Huntington, WV and the message I created to raise awareness of orphans. Meanwhile you can read more about the Artisans Express project here- Public Art Inspires.

Gratitude

Thursday, February 19th, 2015

The children of Dorie's Promise showing their gratitude for all the sponsors and donors who have give to their home.

By MJ Zelya-

Orphans from Guatemala have found on oasis at Dorie's Promise.This note really has been inspired by God…I feel He spoke to my heart, urging me to express my gratitude and thanking those who have been channels of blessing to us, no matter the size or shape. What matters is the motivation behind people’s generosity — LOVE.

It’s amazing how God manifests Himself through people or things — reminding you at every moment what He needs you to do. This happens to me all the time.

He put on my heart that we should be thankful at all times, regardless of the circumstances we are facing. Very recently my mom passed away. It has been difficult to pass this test in life — my mom was very young and did not expect her departure so soon. The first thing that came to my mind were the children of Dorie’s Promise, and how they also go through a bereavement — leaving their family and the environment they know, many because they were neglected or orphaned.

Many sponsors, missionaries, and donors have been able to support these children by giving them a home, an oasis, where they can find love, security, education. A home that maybe doesn’t fully fill the emptiness of a lost family, but certainly helps heal the wounds left by the circumstances of life. We believe that God has sent them here to change their weeping and mourning into joy, Psalm (30:11-12) — He always has a plan for our lives (Jeremiah 29:11).

Simple Gratitude - Dorie's PromiseWe have seen God move through many people, filling us with blessing, always providing what we need.

Every donation, no matter how small or big it is, is very important to us. A donation of furniture we received this month … the money that was raised to reach the finish line to buy new cars, clothing, medicine — and more. These many blessing are impacting those living in extreme poverty, those who need a ray of hope.

Being thankful is a fundamental characteristic of those who believe in God, because it allows us to bring the Gospel and to honor His name in everything we receive. It is grace poured on us through people, and it extends to our children, to our home, and to our community.

It is necessary to always “give thanks for everything to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Ephesians 5:20 NLT).

And pray not only because you are in need of something, but also because you have a lot of things to be thankful for….

Give A Special Gift to Orphans

Friday, December 12th, 2014

Give a Gift to Orphans : Become a Sponsor

Sponsoring a child is a gift that gives a life – Forever Changed.

Our goal is to see Dorie’s Promise Guatemala fully funded by monthly sponsors.  By funding our home 100% through sponsorship, we can be certain that our monthly obligations will be met. It is essential that as a ministry we are responsible in how we go about funding our home and its growth in order to serve even more children in the years to come. If we are able to reach our goal, we will be able to use additional gifts to expand our ministry to serve even more children! Every gift you give to our ministry goes toward improving the lives of orphans and children who would otherwise have no other hope.

Get started by viewing the children currently available to Sponsor, reading our FAQ and sponsorship benefits.

Here are three special children who need you to sponsor them today:

Sponsor Dulce Today!Dulce (Age 2) is a very special child to us. When a mere newborn, Dulce was found bloodied and lying on a bar room floor. Most likely premature, she came to us with low birth weight, low height, small head circumference, and developmental delay. Shortly after her arrival at Dorie’s, she developed viral pneumonia. She was hospitalized and, miraculously, as tiny and frail as she was, she recovered. Since coming to us in July 2012, she has suffered a myriad of health problems.

Dulce is a fighter — she has been fighting to survive ever since she was born. Her Special Mother Myriam prays every day for Dulce’s life. She is improving slowly with increasing weight and increased mobility of her arms and legs. We are hopeful that with the love and care she is receiving, Dulce will continue to thrive.

Josue (Age 2) was found abandoned on the streets in Guatemala City when he was only two days old. He was sent immediately to the hospital where it was discovered that he had a genetic abdominal defect. While there, he had numerous surgeries to correct the problem. Josue was brought to Dorie’s and was transferred to the care of our staff physician. He has been waiting on more surgery to rebuild his urinary tract but is making tremendous progress.

Josue also has a lot of fight in him. He has tremendous energy and enthusiasm for life. He is happy by nature and is very active and affectionate. Josue likes to imitate the older boys and tags along after them as much as they will allow.

Abraham Emanual (Age 6) came to Dorie’s Promise via court order in the Spring of 2012. He was 4. His father abandoned the family when he was an infant and then his mother died. Relatives took Abraham in, but shortly thereafter Protective Services removed him from the home because of abuse and neglect. With the love and sense of security Abraham is receiving at Dorie’s Promise, he is blossoming into a wonderful little boy. He has big brown eyes and a beautiful smile. He loves to play with toys, run in the backyard, and play with the other children. Whenever it is time for group activities, Abraham is the first to jump in. He is a great dancer and loves to play soccer.

Please consider sponsoring a child today!