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About Heather Radu

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Here are my most recent posts

6 Months After the Fire… Moving Forward On Faith

Friday, October 20th, 2017

The three children from Virgen de la Asuncion who now live at Dorie's Promise.

By Heather Radu –

Myra is now thriving at Dorie's PromiseSix months ago the news rang out across the world that an orphanage in Guatemala had burned to the ground and children had died. 

After the fire, our team immediately knew that we wanted to help in any way possible.  We did many things like send food, water, and blankets to help the children there in need.

The best thing our team did was accept several children into our home.

We didn’t really have the space or the budget to accept them but we took them anyway moving forward on faith knowing it was the right action to take.

Each child that came to us faced different challenges because of their individual background and the conditions that they had lived in previously.  The government orphanage was a large facility that housed hundreds of children and the caregivers weren’t able to give the level of individual care that we would expect in our home.  The ensuing investigation brought to light a history of abuse, mistreatment, and neglect resulting in several people being charged with various offenses related to the facility and fire.

Moving from those conditions to our home after such a traumatic event has been difficult for the children, but we are happy to share six months later, we are seeing great progress.

Cecilia, our staff psychologist, shared with me some of the growth that she has seen in these children.  I want to share that with you and ask for your continued help to take care of them.

Manuel and one of the Special Mother's enjoy a game of UNO at Dorie's Promise.Christina was scared, Myra was skeptical, Manuel needed extra care. It was not easy for them to learn to trust again, but because of the patient loving care of our staff the children have opened up. They are engaging with others, trusting again, and dreaming again.

We are so thankful for the opportunity to impact these children and help them thrive after experiencing such a great trauma and loss.

Now it is time to take the next step and get them enrolled in school!

Please stand with me and consider a special gift to help make sure that each and every one of our children receives the education they need to learn and mature.

The average cost of sending a child to a private school in Guatemala is $1,700 per year. That’s just about $142 a month — which covers everything they need; tuition, books, uniforms, after-school activities, tutoring, supplies, and transportation. We’d like to raise $25,500 before December 31. 

Give Today!

 

P.S. Thanks to you Myra, Manuel, and Christina are thriving.  Let’s help them take the next step in their care and make sure they get the best education we can give them in Guatemala City.

Ten-Year Employees Recognized

Tuesday, May 30th, 2017

The employees who have been with Dorie’s Promise for 10 years or longer. We couldn’t have done it without them.

By Heather Radu –

Founder, Heather Radu recognizes the long term employees.One of the most joyous occasions of this spring was honoring—and saying thanks to—all the employees who have been with Dorie’s Promise for 10 years or longer.

We couldn’t have done it without them. They have stayed with us through the years and even in the most difficult of times, have been there with a smile.

Their names are Lucia, Diana, Marleni, Ingrid, Mina, Mimi, Juanita, Noemi, Lucky, Ismelda, Oscar, Abel, Doc and Ale.

Showing what kind of caring spirit they have, on their night of recognition they also thanked me for the opportunity to be part of the organization. They gave a special thanks to God too because, here at Forever Changed International, they found their real calling for life.

It is difficult to over-estimate the value of our long-term employees to the stability of the ministry, the smooth operations at Dorie’s Promise, and the security our children sense from seeing many of the same faces day after day, year after year.

It was a big moment for me, too, as the occasion reminded me of how I hired some of them in 2000, when the home just opened.

Later, when we were living in Guatemala, some of them were part of our family. Literally, since they pitched in and helped us raise our own children. Though now grown, our kids retain many fond memories of their time at Dorie’s Promise.

After these many years, it is not just the hard work or a salary that keeps those people with FCI. It is because we have become a family and, by seeing them working every day, I can tell they are passionate about what they do. Our children are lucky to have people who really care about them and love them.

It is worth noting that their efforts often lack the “glamor” of a mission trip or the excitement that many people associate with “ministry.”At the ceremony to recognize employees.

Every parent can understand the long hours, constant effort, training and worry that is part of raising a child. The same can be said of raising orphans, many whom come from backgrounds of poverty and abuse.

It requires diligence, patience of the highest order, and a willingness to devote your life outside of the spotlight, wondering whether you will ever see breakthroughs with children who struggle against enormous odds.

Why do they do it? In one word: love. Love of God and love for the children treated by many as outcasts.

Their rewards come in the form of caring smiles, words spoken for the first time, and children who achieve the kind of things once thought impossible. We can’t thank them enough for their devotion.

Saying Good-Bye to Missions Director Pablo Villagran

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

Pablo with children from Dorie's Promise.

By Heather Radu –

Pablo recently joined the United Nations’ public information department in Guatemala City. We received news recently that both excites and disappoints us. We are thrilled over the possibilities opening up for Pablo Villagran, but are sad to see him depart as our Missions Director.

Pablo recently joined the United Nations’ public information department in Guatemala City. Though not an easy decision to make, Pablo is confident that this where God wants him to be.

“It’s been an amazing opportunity to work with Forever Changed International for four years,” says Pablo, who started with us as a ministry assistant. “I truly enjoyed my time here.

I have experienced many highlights, such as getting to be a part of children’s lives, working with so many missions teams, building schools, and supporting programs that will benefit hundreds of children in vulnerable areas.”

Moving forward, we will rely on four different mission trip leaders to coordinate volunteer missionaries’ visits. They will work in rotating teams of two or three, depending on the size of each group.

Missions Coordinator Naomi Beazely spent nearly two weeks in Guatemala to help facilitate the hiring and training of new team leaders. We have hired three motivated and passionate leaders. The fourth is expected soon.

“We have been able to spend time getting to know each of them personally,” Naomi says. “We have started training, and they are all excited to meet the teams this summer. As I go home, I am confident in our staff to continue to train and support them.”

Pablo racing with some of the children from Dorie's Promise.Granted, these new leaders will have big shoes to fill. Pablo built an amazing community program by personally visiting different areas and creating relationships with various community leaders.

Naomi says such relationships built trust and an understanding of the need to better residents’ lives. Because of that, she is confident the foundation established since 2013 will continue to expand.

“We have been able to work with families by building up their spiritual strength, education and living conditions,” Naomi says. “Pablo was very successful because when he listened to the needs of these families, he not only thought of how we could help them immediately, but also how to help better their future.”

Pablo says working with Forever Changed International showed him the overwhelming needs within Guatemala and how much progress remains to be made.

During his time, Pablo documented many harsh realities, but also helped empower Guatemalans and bring solutions to those in need. His experience included working with the orphan crisis and helping children who suffered from abuse and abandonment.

“Dorie’s Promise helped me a lot in preparing for my new position,” Pablo says. “I have a hard time saying good-bye, so I will just say until next time.”

It is hard for us to say good-bye to Pablo too, but we wish him the best.

Former Resident Raises $1,000

Wednesday, May 17th, 2017

When she and a friend set up a lemonade stand, Abigail made a Guatemalan flag to attach to their collection jar.

By Heather Radu –

Abigail raised $1000 by appealing to family, neighbors and friends for donations. Many generous donors sponsor children, conduct fund-raising events, and give to keep Dorie’s Promise running. But we recently learned about the most unique fund-raising effort conducted in 2016: a former resident organized it.

Nine-year-old Abigail Standifer was one of our last children involved in an international adoption, becoming John and Susan Standifer’s daughter in 2008.

While John sent us a check in late December for $1,000, he only recently shared the full story. Abigail raised those funds by appealing to family, neighbors and friends for donations.

Originally, she told nearby residents she was raising money for children in an orphanage in Guatemala. When she and a friend set up a lemonade stand, Abigail made a Guatemalan flag to attach to their collection jar.

“After that, she took the flag jar and went to some other neighbors,” says John, the sales manager for a small pharmaceutical company in Knoxville, Tennessee. “With our extended family, we used a letter from Forever Changed to discuss specific needs. She explained to everyone that this was the orphanage where she was born.”

The fund-raising effort took two months. The largest single donation of $250 came from one of Abigail’s aunts.

However, another one that really touched her heart came from a 22-year-old cousin. After she talked about the drive, he gave her everything in his wallet—twenty dollars. $20. She tried to return it, but he insisted she keep it.

While Abigail felt good about her campaign, later she wondered whether she had raised enough. However, FCI’s letter of thanks that explained its significance helped her better understand her accomplishment.Forever Changed International

“We are so proud of Abigail,” her father says. “She has this huge heart and desire to help people, and talks about this quite a bit. We were not surprised when she decided she wanted to raise money for her orphanage. I suspect she will want to do it again.”

In addition, Abigail has sparked interest among family members about visiting Dorie’s Promise. One of her cousins took a mission trip this spring; he had his choice of destinations and picked Guatemala because of Abigail’s influence.

The Standifers hope to return, too, especially since their daughter has been asking about going. Though much younger than brothers Weston (17) and Cade (13), John says Abigail has made their family complete.

Noting that Abigail’s name means “a father’s joy,” he says Susan felt like God placed that word in her heart during the adoption process.

“When we got the call about Abigail, we knew immediately she was our daughter,” John says. “She has brought tons of joy into our house since day one. We have friends who nicknamed her ‘Smiley.’ We can’t imagine her not being here.”

Such stories put a smile on our face, too.

School Completed in Santa Elena

Monday, May 1st, 2017

At long last, the school that Dorie’s Promise and more than 25 of our volunteer mission teams helped build is nearly complete.

By Heather Radu –

At long last, the school that Dorie’s Promise and more than 25 of our volunteer mission teams helped build is nearly complete.Located in Santa Elena, about an hour from Guatemala City, there are presently 100 children enrolled there. When the 2018 school year starts next January, more than 260 students, ages 5 to 14, are expected to attend.

Located in Santa Elena, about an hour from Guatemala City, there are presently 100 children enrolled there. When the 2018 school year starts next January, more than 260 students, ages 5 to 14, are expected to attend.

FCI coordinated the project through city hall and community leaders. Construction started in April of 2016 and was finished in February.

The final touches will be installation of a retaining wall and drainpipe. Members of Bethany Lutheran Church in Connecticut have donated funds to purchase the materials.

Pablo Villagran, who recently stepped down as DP’s missions director, coordinated most of the project. This school is invaluable to the people of Santa Elena, who have been waiting for a school for more than 30 years.

In the past, residents took their children to another school across the highway. Sadly, several kids lost their lives trying to cross the busy road to attend this crowded, overpopulated school.

Sergio Mejia was the architect in charge of the design and logistics. The project became a reality because of the great financial support of Ronald Hille.

Because of limited storage space, a fluctuating number of masons, and changing weather, we decided to complete the construction in stages. We finished the foundation, walls and flooring for the first module before moving on to the second.

The steps for each module included installation of the roof, bathrooms and septic tank, doors and windows, perimeter, painting, and interior systems—lighting, electricity and plumbing.

Because of limited storage space, a fluctuating number of masons, and changing weather, we decided to complete the construction in stages. We faced challenges along the way. There was an agreement that FCI would be the benefactor, supplying all materials and coordinating the work. Meanwhile, the municipality was to provide much of the manpower. However, on some days only one or two workers came to the site, which slowed construction. We wound up having to hire a couple workers to help for six weeks.

In addition, after work had begun, municipal leaders pressed for changes in the design. We adapted the design to fulfill their requests.

Even though most of the construction is complete, the school will require ongoing maintenance. Among the recommendations are painting the classrooms annually to avoid moisture damage to the walls, cleaning the septic tank every two years, and applying waterproofing to the roof every five years to avoid oxidation.

Needless to say, the mission teams who supplemented the ongoing construction at the school, were invaluable to this effort. This is a great success for FCI as an organization. It is also a great motivator for our ministry to keep working on behalf of people living in vulnerable areas.

Ana’s School Breakthrough!

Monday, December 12th, 2016

Ana is in the fourth grade.By Heather Radu –

A beaming Ana at her school, Shaddai.Last week I gave you updates on Nayeli and Brayan (if you missed it, read that post here.) I’d really like you to know about Ana too. Because of your help, we have been able to get Ana into a wonderful Christian school called Shaddai. She is in the fourth grade. When she came to us 7 years ago, she was behind in her schooling. We worked with her, of course, but always knew her math skills were lagging.

This year she’s had a breakthrough! Her teacher has been spending extra time with her on math. Ana has been getting regular tutoring on the subject … and you know what? She was recently selected to represent the school in a math competition!

She did well and proved to herself that it just takes extra effort to get ahead and do well in school. What a great life lesson!

Alej says that Ana is now talking about attending college and becoming a doctor someday!

Ana had a breakthrough in school this year.Stories like Ana’s, of lives that being changed at Dorie’s Promise, are an every day occurrence. They are stories of lives being changed because of you, your heart, and your giving.

We need to raise about $30,000 to secure schooling for our children before their school year begins in January. Please pray about it. Whatever God lays on your heart to contribute, I want to urge you to give it today.

When you give, I want to do something really special for you. I’ve been thinking about what would be nice to do that would connect you with the work of education. If you can send a gift of $100 or more, I want to send you one of our children’s report cards with a note from them saying thank you. My hope is you will keep it close by — on the fridge or in your office or in your Bible — somewhere it will remind you of the important work you are doing in Guatemala to help the orphans at Dorie’s Promise grow and thrive.

Let me hear from you soon. We are making plans for schooling for each of our children as you read this. Please Give Today.

It is Almost Time for School… (January Begins A New School Year in Guatemala)

Monday, December 12th, 2016

Maria is all packed up and ready for school!

By Heather Radu –

Take a moment to stop and remember what it was like to get ready for a new school year.

The new shoes, new clothes, maybe a new backpack or even pee-chee folders. It was all so exciting — like a new adventure was about to start.

Nayeli shortly before leaving to study in the USA.I want to give you an update on Nayeli. As you may know, Nayeli is on a student visa to the United States. She’s the oldest child in the home and has grown into a woman of God with a heart that is tender and kind. Her passion for learning is real, and because of that she’s now able to study in the United States. Please join me in praising God for this young woman. I’ve known her since she was 3. To watch her grow and thrive is a testament to the work we are doing at Dorie’s Promise Guatemala.

I also want to tell you about Brayan.

We have had Brayan in our care since 2009. When he was young, he was a fiery little guy — nearly impossible to control. Some of it was due to his independent spirit … some because of a slight learning disability.

Over the years, we have worked diligently with Brayan to help him achieve and overcome. One of the ways we have been able to do that is getting him into a special technical school. It has allowed him to explore and develop different skills that will help him in the work place as he matures.
His favorite class at school is music, and he is learning to play guitar. He also enjoys the cooking and computer classes. Alej says, “Every morning he is ready to go to school with a big smile — and the only reason for that is because he enjoys every day and is making good friends there.”

This is what it means to see a life Forever Changed!Brayan gets hands on experience at his technical school.

But Nayeli and Brayan are not the only children doing well.

As we look ahead, I want to ask you to help us continue to make sure our children get the best education possible. This is the key to building a better life, to breaking the cycle of poverty. I truly believe that the children who rise up from Dorie’s Promise will be leaders in this country someday — that they will speak truth to the problems that created the scenario in which they were left alone as children.

Please stand with me and consider a special gift to help them go to the schools that will best help them learn and mature.

The average cost of sending a child to a private school in Guatemala is $1,700 per year. That’s just about $142 a month — which covers tuition, books, uniforms, after-school activities, tutoring, supplies, and transportation.

I would like to invite you to help us give our children an exceptional educational experience through your kind giving. I don’t know what you could give. My role is to ask for the children, so I’m asking. Maybe you could give a gift of $1,000 or $500. Maybe that’s too much. Maybe you are better able to give a gift of $50 or $100. Give today.

I want you to know everything you do for our children helps and makes a real difference! Thank you!

Vision, Hopes, And Dreams…

Monday, December 5th, 2016

Education at Dorie's Promise is tailored to each child.

By Heather Radu –

Our staff has never been in a better place. For years, we have had to spend a lot of time working on the daily operations and staffing. We have had staff come and go … in my opinion, the mix of personalities and talent was just never exactly right to give our children and the home the kind of care and attention they needed.

Today all that has changed. This is the best I have seen our operations run in Guatemala since the day we started. These changes in our home have allowed me to be able to engage our team and talk and dream about the future.

Those are the hopes and dreams and ideas I want you to read about.

Dr. Castro continues to work with us and make sure our children get the best possible health care.Health Care

Dr. Castro continues to work with us and make sure our children get the best possible health care. I am completely confident in his abilities in this area and look forward to his partnership for many years to come. As you know, we decided a few years ago that the mental health of our children was also a priority. We have made significant investments in this area and will continue to do so. As the children get older, we are seeing an even greater need for this kind of therapy. We must continue to be focused on mental health issues so that our children can really grow and thrive.

Education

We are spending a lot of time and energy on finding the right schools for our children. Last week we had two 6th grade graduations — Jennifer and Ingrid finished elementary school. When I heard Ingrid received her diploma, what immediately came to mind was the little girl who came to our home seven years ago. She had never studied. She was afraid to even think about the idea. But today her world is totally different. She has dreams, she has goals to reach. I am confident there will be a day when we see her becoming a professional. Some of our children, like Ingrid and Jennifer, have the ability to go on to college. Others are going to need to be focused on a technical track. Our tutor is helping each of our children and identifying things they love, talking with them about their hopes and dreams. Join me in continuing to pray for them and their education. Our goal is to put them each on a path that amplifies their natural abilities and allows them to be successful.

Brayan, has been learning to play the guitar, and two weeks ago he had a performance at his school. Extracurricular

Giving children the opportunity to expand their horizons is huge. And extracurricular activities are the best way to do that. Brayan, for example, has been learning to play the guitar, and two weeks ago he had a performance at his school. He did so well! The audience loved his performance. His teacher complimented his natural talent. Giving our children exposure to activities like soccer, tennis, and martial arts teaches them discipline as well. It allows them to interact with adults outside the home and learn respect. It also teaches them hobbies that are popular in Guatemalan culture — ones they will probably use with their own children and grandchildren.

English

One of the best things we can do for our children is to teach them English. This is one of the key factors for being financially successful in Guatemala. Our children are always exposed to English with our mission trip guests. Ana is our star right now. She has been taking some English courses at school. Paul, a volunteer who teaches English, is coming to Dorie’s twice per week and is surprised at the interest and capacity that Ana is showing to learn English. We want to give all our children the opportunity to speak English, learn it, know it, and internalize it. Our team believes this is possible for all our children.

International Exposure

Nayeli is a first example of giving one of our children international exposure. She is currently studying in the United States, and we are learning more and more about how to do it in the future. Our children, from their earliest ages, get a chance to interact with Americans and Canadians. Being able to send them out of Guatemala and give them a bigger picture of the world is very important to our team.

Ana is our star English student/Our Board believes, and I hope you do, too, that by helping our children in these ways, we will be opening up a world of opportunities to them.

These are the hopes and dreams of our staff in Guatemala City. These are things we can do together, and what I believe God is calling us to do. 

Your generosity will be used to help all our children grow and thrive and become the people God created them to be.

If you’re like me, you see each one of them as more than just an orphaned child. You see their value and their purpose. Thank you for being part of their lives!

This December, please help us with a special gift for the children. Before the years out, we need to raise around $30,000. In order to raise that amount, it is going to take all of us— you, me, everyone we know. Please share this update with your friends. Spread it on social media, email it to your church mission committee,  print and give it to your grandmother— get the word out.

Help us reach this year-end goal!

Help Us Keep A Good Thing Going…

Monday, November 28th, 2016

Yohana, one of the children at Dorie's Promise, is all smiles because of the care she recieves at our home.

By Heather Radu –

As we come to the Christmas season, I want to give you a vision for where we are headed together concerning the care of our children at Dorie’s Promise in Guatemala.

Things have been slowly changing at our homes in Guatemala City for a few years now. You may have noticed. We are getting better at what we do!

Good change is happening among the children, our leadership team, and the special mothers.Good change is happening among the children, our leadership team, and the special mothers.

I am excited to say we are starting to function like an organized family!

Of course, every family still sees all kinds of unexpected things, making organization and “easy living” virtually impossible. If you’ve ever been charged with the care of a couple of kids, you know exactly what I mean.

There are sicknesses that start and then spread to everyone in the family. There are unexpected birthday parties at the homes of friends. There are always tests at school the kids forget to tell you about. But even with all of that, I’m thrilled to see things improve at Dorie’s Promise.

I want to share some of that with you (stay tuned for our next blog post to learn more.) Rejoice with me and dream with me this season. God has a plan for our little ones!

We are going into a new phase of life. To adapt and do this, our team really needs your help.

As I write this, all I can think about is how grateful I am for you! Without your help, our children would be in terrible places. I can’t bear to even think about them being anywhere else. This is where God wants them right now. Thank you for being part of His plan for them.

Help Us Keep A Good Thing Going... God has a plan for our little ones!This is why I know I can ask you to consider a special gift today.

December is a great time of the year to give. Since we are quickly approaching Christmas, please consider setting aside a special gift to help the Children of Dorie’s Promise. Before the end of the year, we really need to see $30,000 come in. And in order to raise that amount, it is going to take all of our friends — you, me, everyone we know — giving, and asking people we know to give.

Pray about doing something special to help us care for these precious children. I don’t know what you could give … that’s between you and God.

I just ask that you do something special. Help us reach this year-end goal! When you give, I know you will be blessed.

Minds At Work

Thursday, October 22nd, 2015

Maria Jose, 11, has studied at El Shaddai for four years

What a difference a few years can make in the life of a child. Now just multiply that change by the number of children at Dorie’s Promise whose lives are changed daily through the gift of attending a private school! The transformation in their young lives is truly amazing. What started with only three of our children attending private school has multiplied to 15 in just a few short years.

Thanks to you and your generous support these past few years, we see and experience firsthand what it means for our children to have an opportunity to attend a private school.

Here is what Maria Jose, 11, who has studied at El Shaddai for four years, has to say about her education:

“I love to study at El Shaddai School because I have two teachers who are very smart and help me a lot with my doubts. I love my teachers and I admire them because they are smart and show me gratitude. My favorite classes are Arts, Spelling, Math, Computer lab, Robotics, Bible Studies, and Sports. In my school I have learned many things, but especially God’s love and how He takes care of us. I would like to keep going to this school because one of my dreams is to be a good teacher, pastor, and gymnast.”

Brayan doing homework.A private education means better teachers, positive influences, spiritual guidance, and the opportunity to see what life is like outside of Dorie’s Promise. Our staff tells us time and time again how these children’s lives are being changed and how much interest and enthusiasm they have for school today — how it shows not only academically, but also in their spiritual and emotional lives.

The only time we will send a child to a public school is when they first arrive at Dorie’s Promise, so we can get an idea of how they perform in a school setting. We have experienced firsthand how poorly the public schools operate and therefore do our best to get our children integrated into a private school setting as soon as possible.

Our Child Development Director takes great care as she creates individualized education plans per child. She takes into consideration their natural talents, academic strengths and weaknesses, and whether they have learning disabilities. Based on this information, children are placed in the school setting that best suits them.

Take, for instance, 12-year-old Ana Lucia, who arrived at Dorie’s Promise July 2014 with her sister, seven-year-old Fabiola. The girls’ older brother was caring for them after their mother died of cancer. He was then arrested for drug dealing and murdered while in prison. This is when they came to live with us. Fabiola was enrolled in public school and was thriving even with class sizes close to 40. This January will be her first year attending private school.

Here is what Ana Lucia has to say about her new life and education…

“Living at Dorie’s Promise means a lot of things to me; I have many mothers taking care of and concerned about me; I have food every day; I have a beautiful bedroom to sleep in. The good thing is that my little sister is with me and we are very happy. This year I again started school and I have good grades. I would like to learn English to speak with the missionaries and also would like to learn computer skills … I would like to go a school where I can learn more.”

12-year-old Ana Lucia, arrived at Dorie’s Promise July 2014 with her sister, seven-year-old Fabiola. As you can imagine sending 15 of our children to private school and providing onsite child development, tutoring, and school does not come without a cost. Would you be willing to invest in our children’s lives in this meaningful way? To give our children the exceptional education they deserve, we need your help.

As I shared in the letter I wrote to you in July, we have had less mission participants this year, which has lowered the amount of income we use to run Dorie’s Promise. Giving our children an exceptional education experience will be the first thing we will have to cut if we are not able to raise the funds to keep it in place. Of course, we want the best education we can possibly give our children … but that can’t come at the expense of feeding, housing, and caring for them.

The school year in Guatemala runs from January through October. We currently have 15 children of school age who are excited to start private school in January.

The average cost of sending a child to private school is $1,700 per year. This amount covers tuition, books, uniforms, after-school activities, tutoring, supplies, and transportation. The total cost for the 15 children ready to attend private school this January is $30,600. The cost to continue to employ a full-time Child Development Director as well as preschool teacher is $25,000 per year.

Imagine being able to give your child a life-changing private education for only $140 per month.

I would like to invite you to help us give our children an EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION experience through your kind giving. Our goal is to raise $55,600 by December 31.

Jennifer loves going to school.The children are growing so fast and we understand that someday they will be leaving us and try to find their place in the world. Our goal is to give them the tools to have a full and meaningful life outside our home.

These are children who have come from the city dump, off the street, or abandoned by family members who are unwilling to give them the care every child needs and deserves. We shelter them, feed them, love them like they are our own — but we also want to continue to give them the gift of EXCEPTIONAL EDUCATION that will impact their lives in so many different ways … both now and for many years into the future.

Again, thank you for all you do for our children. It is your heart and passion that drive this ministry forward and allow us to change the lives of the children in our care. I hope to hear from you soon. Everyone on our team would like to see us meet our goal of raising $55,600 as quickly as possible so we can make sure our plan for 2016 is solid and ready to execute. Help by giving today.

God Bless,
Heather Radu
Founder